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Posted 04/07/2017
Conservation photography can take many forms, and we will offer our definition, but more importantly, we will speak with noted outdoor photographer Art Wolfe about his definition of the term. After “Al’s Gearhead Pick of the Week,” we are joined by Mr. Wolfe for a segment in which we discuss how he produces beautiful images in the service of a greater cause. Wolfe is currently working on a project on African elephants and the critical need to safeguard their existence. From this topic, the conversation easily flows to the funding of expeditions through workshops and book deals to the work of other photographers promoting awareness on a global scale and photographers tackling local issues of concern to them. Above Photograph © Art Wolfe After a break, we are joined by David Brommer, director of OPTIC 2017-Outdoor, Photo/Video, Travel Imaging Conference, who will give us a preview of this year’s event, held June 4-7, in New York City. The theme of this year’s conference is conservation and the environment, so it is fitting that we pair him with Art Wolfe; however, the photographers who present at OPTIC represent a wide range of styles and concerns, and the topics discussed range from the aesthetic to the technical to the practical. Brommer provides us with a sense of the breadth of this photographic talent, as well as the manufacturers who will attend and festoon their booths with gear for everyone to try. Guests: Art Wolfe and David Brommer African Elephants, Savuti Marsh, Chobe National Park, Botswana: I was in a small boat as these elephants crossed the channel and hauled themselves out dark and slick with water. What I really like about this image is the implied African Elephants, Okavango Delta, Botswana: I set up by a shallow pond and was able to position the camera in a way to capture the width of the landscape Humpback Whale, Vava'u, Tonga: Tonga is one of the very few places you can actually snorkel within close proximity to whales. We had just five days on the water and four of them were just too windy and the whales were very shy. In a more outgoing moment, a whale swam by and eyeballed me. It was extraordinary. Puma, Torres del Paine National Park, Chile. African Elephant, Okavango Delta, Botswana: An African elephant's tusks are used for defense, digging for roots, stripping bark, and fighting during mating season. Previous Pause Next Art Wolfe DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/31/2017
This is one of our most informative and, dare I say, best episodes yet. We talk about emulsion-based and inkjet photographic paper, with an emphasis on inkjet papers. We are fortunate to be joined by two talented and articulate guests, photographer Robert Rodriguez Jr. and August Pross, Print Manager and co-owner of LTI-Lightside photographic lab, in New York City. In addition to his outstanding landscape photography, Rodriguez is an author with three books on photography to his credit. He leads a very popular workshop series and is an ambassador for Canson-Infinity paper products. LTI-Lightside is well-known for its professional photo services and as the custom printer for many acclaimed fine-art photographers. In this episode, we talk about the various types of paper available for printing at home and at a lab, and discuss the differences between paper from Fujifilm, Epson, Kodak, Hahnemuhle, Ilford, and others. Topics we touch upon are optical brighteners, outgassing, printing profiles, and Wilhelm Imaging Research, but the focus of our conversation often returns to the tactile nature of the print and the need to understand a photographic print as an entirely different concept than an image on a screen. In addition to the wonderful dialogue, stay tuned throughout the episode for a B&H Photography Podcast exclusive promo code for a discount on all Canson paper products. Also, be sure to visit our podcast homepage for all of our episodes and, while you are there, leave us a voice message on the SpeakPipe widget. Click on this link to subscribe to our show on iTunes. Guests: Robert Rodriguez Jr. and August Pross Robert Rodriguez, Allan Weitz, August Pross Previous Pause Next Robert Rodriguez Jr DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/10/2017
On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss long-term documentary projects, particularly those that deal with immigration and social issues. Both of our guests are currently working on projects that span several years, and we talk about the commitment, the technique, the goals, and the gear that go into their work. Our first guest is Griselda San Martin, a Spanish photographer who has been telling stories of immigration, deportation, and the often-blurred lines of national identity. One of her series profiles Las Delfinas, a girl’s flag-football team from a high school, in Tijuana, Mexico. Her project on families who meet on both sides of the U.S.–Mexico border wall for weekly reunions centers on a deported man who sings through the wall to his daughter on the other side,  and her current four-year project profiles U.S. veterans being deported as a consequence of criminal convictions.  After a break, we speak with Salwan Georges, a staff photographer for the Detroit Free Press who, in addition to his daily assignments, is documenting the immigrant communities of Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan. This is a subject close to his heart—Georges came to the United States as a refugee, in 2004. With San Martin and Georges, we talk about the practical aspects of their work, from camera choices to raising funds to simply making time for the work. We also discuss communication, establishing trust with subjects and the inspiration and goals for their projects. Finally, because both photographers incorporate video into their work, we ask if there is a limit to what a still photo enables them to say. Guests: Griselda San Martin and Salwan Georges   Members of Las Delfinas football team practice near their school, in Rosarito, Mexico. Griselda San Martin   People meet weekly at the border wall in Tijuana, Mexico, to talk with family members on the other side of the wall. Griselda San Martin   Jose Marquez goes to Friendship Park, in Tijuana, once a month to catch up with his daughter and sing to her through the border wall. Griselda San Martin The Buteh family, refugees from war-torn Syria, drive to a hotel after their arrival at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, 2015. Salwan Georges Father and son, refugees from Syria, play on the balcony of their home in Dearborn, Michigan. Salwan Georges/Detroit Free Press   Shi’a Iraqis participate in Arba'een walk on Sunday, December 14, 2014, in Dearborn, Michigan. Salwan Georges A young Iraqi boy helps his father grill buffalo fish, one of the most popular fish entrees in Iraq, over a fire pit. Dearborn, Michigan. Salwan Georges   Nassour Yacoub with his younger brothers Seid Yacoub, (left), and Khatir Yacoub, near their home in Detroit. "There was no one to help us. As the older son, I had to help raise my siblings and take care of my mom. Life was hard," said Nassour. The two youngest sons are young enough to adapt, and are slowly becoming accustomed to their new home in inner-city Detroit. Salwan Georges/Detroit Free Press, 2014 An Iraqi immigrant photographed behind a local coffee shop, in Detroit, Michigan. Salwan Georges Salwan Georges and Griselda San Martin DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 01/13/2017
Today we present our inaugural Gear Podcast, a monthly feature of the B&H Photography Podcast that focuses solely on new cameras, lenses, and photo gear. We have always discussed photography equipment, but the Gear Podcast is branded to speak to our gear-head cohorts and those looking specifically for an insightful conversation on the latest available cameras, lenses, and accessories and the most appropriate applications for them. We will still talk about gear on other episodes and will not abandon our eclectic conversations on a wide range of photography subjects, but with the Gear Podcast tag appearing once a month, you can be sure gear will be the subject. Our first Gear Podcast is on third-party lenses and the alternatives to the “glass” produced by the major camera manufacturers. From high-end optics to affordable knock-offs to respected lens makers, such as Tamron and Tokina, we will discuss what is new, what is being offered, and for what type of shooter they may be the right choice. Joining us is photographer, Product Specialist, and B&H trainer extraordinaire Levi Tenenbaum. In the first half of the program, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of third-party lenses and why we are seeing an uptick in their numbers. After a short break, we return with a detailed list of the companies currently producing third-party lenses for DSLR and mirrorless cameras, and what you can expect from each one. Guest: Levi Tenenbaum Handevision IBELUX 40mm f/0.85 Lens Meyer-Optik Gorlitz Primoplan 75mm f/1.9 Lens Tokina FiRIN 20mm f/2 FE MF Lens Yongnuo YN 50mm f/1.8 Lens Zeiss Batis 18mm f/2.8 Lens Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di USD G2 Tokina AT-X 24-70mm f/2.8 PRO FX Lens Voigtlander Nokton 17.5mm f/0.95 Lens Jason Tables, Levi Tenenbaum, and Allan Weitz DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 12/08/2016
Continuing with our series of conversations from the Eddie Adams Workshop, we sit with National Geographic photographer Steve Winter to talk about his work and career, specifically regarding capturing images and telling the stories of the big cats of the world. Winter started his photojournalism career in the social documentary tradition and, working for the famed Black Star agency, fate (and fear) pushed him into the world of wildlife photography. He tells us how his path shifted, how he blends photojournalism and wildlife photography and how specializing in one subject has benefitted his career. With many adventures and close calls under his belt, he relates how travel and gear logistics and long stretches away from home can be the hardest part of his job. He also talks gear choices, working with scientists and local trackers and drone photography. Winter’s work spans the globe and includes an ark full of creatures, but he is most recognized for his big-cat photography, which entails long expeditions in mountains and jungles and also the proficient use of camera traps to photograph elusive animals remotely, including the cougar known as P-22, which Winter photographed in its territory—the Hollywood hills.  Guest: Steve Winter All Photos © Steve Winter/ National Geographic A tiger peers at a camera trap it triggered while hunting in the early morning in the forests of northern Sumatra, Indonesia. 2009 With proper protection and enough prey tigers breed easily. This four year old tigress returned to the cave where she was born to have her first litter. Bandhavgarh National Park, India. 2011 A villager honors a slain elephant with incense and prayers, reflecting the Hindu belief that these pachyderms are sacred. This animal was illegally shot with a bullet soaked in acid while it was raiding a rice field near Kaziranga National Park, India. It died of its wounds a few days later. 2007 These men were apprehended while trying to sell a tiger skin near Chandrapur, India. Illegal trade in tiger bone, eyes, whiskers, penises, teeth and other parts for traditional Chinese medicine may generate up to five million dollars a year. Most poaching is done by local people trying to supplement their income. 2011 A leopard drinks at a waterhole where the caretaker of a local shrine lives with his livestock just outside Mumbai, India. 2014 Photographer Steve Winter sets up a camera trap on a beach in Yala National Park, Sri Lanka, in hopes of photographing a leopard that’s known to roam the beach in search of prey.   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 11/03/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon, with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. Tim Rasmussen, Director of Digital and Print Photography at ESPN, joined us for a chat in our improvised studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Prior to ESPN, Rasmussen was the Assistant Managing Editor of Photography and Multimedia at the Denver Post and under his lead, their photo department earned three Pulitzer Prizes. Tim is also a member of the Board of Directors at the Eddie Adams Workshop and, in addition to having been a team leader, producer and editor at the workshop, he was a student in its very first year—1988. Our conversation with Rasmussen revolves around the workshop—how he came to attend the first-ever workshop, why it has become a breeding ground and “sanctuary” for two generations of talented photojournalists and, of course, around Eddie Adams himself. We also talk with Rasmussen about his own career, transition from photographer to editor, and how he ended up at ESPN. Within this relaxed conversation there is much to learn—about the threads of life and the nature of commitment, about the practice of photojournalism and, particularly for young photographers, about what an editor looks for when hiring a photographer. Photograph above © Tim Rasmussen Guest: Tim Rasmussen Eddie Adams. Photograph by ©Tim Rasmussen The Board of Directors of the Eddie Adams Workshop, 1992. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen The first Black Team at the workshop recreates Joe Rosenthal’s famous Iwo Jima image with Rosenthal in attendance. Photo Courtesy Tim Rasmussen Gregory Heisler at the first ever Eddie Adams Workshop, 1988. Photo courtesy Tim Rasmussen From the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Photographer Carol Guzy preparing for her talk at the barn Photographer Adrees Latif with student at 11:30 Club portfolio review Tim Rasmussen editing student’s work Photographer Marco Grob during his talk in the barn Editor Jim Colton offers advice to a student Photographer Nick Ut running for “president” at the 2016 Eddie Adams Workshop Students check out each other’s work at 11:30 Club   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/28/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast was very fortunate to be invited to the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop this year. The annual workshop, officially sponsored by Nikon with support from B&H, is a unique and inspiring event, bringing together 100 young photographers with some of the world’s most recognized photojournalists and editors, including thirteen Pulitzer Prize winners, for four intense days of photographic presentation and collaboration. The team leaders and speakers are a who’s-who of the photojournalism community, and we took our opportunity to sit down with as many of them as we could for conversations that ranged from personal inspiration and technical innovation to the photographer-editor relationship and how to set a camera trap for mountain lions. In the weeks to come, we will present several of our “conversations from the barn,” thus named because we created an impromptu studio in the fabled barn on the Eddie Adams farm. Our first conversation joins Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer John H. White and photographer, artist, and educator Endia Beal. Mr. White could be considered the spiritual heart of the workshop and anyone who hears him speak will understand why. His work for Chicago’s daily newspapers dates back to the late 1960s, and he was on staff at the Chicago Sun-Times when he earned his Pulitzer. His work is well rounded, as any newspaper photographer’s should be, and covers events big and small, but it his depiction of Chicago’s African-American community that has garnered the most attention. We speak with him about his upbringing in North Carolina, his relationship with his subjects, including his friend Muhammad Ali, and the most important camera he has ever used. Endia Beal is an accomplished artist currently serving as Associate Professor of Art and the Director of the Diggs Gallery at Winston-Salem State University. Her early artistic work emerged from personal tragedy and called into question cultural and skin-color-based stereotypes in her hometown community. Her more recent work continues to pose questions, exploring the identity of minority women within the corporate space. Join us as we chat with these two remarkable people about their lives and work. Photograph above © John H. White Guests: Endia Beal and John H. White Photographs above © John H. White Alexus Kyandra and Shakiya Martinique Sabrina and Katrina Photographs from the series "Am I What You're Looking For?" © Endia Beal Endia Beal | Photograph © John H. White John H. White | Photograph © John Harris John White accepting award at the 29th Eddie Adams Workshop, October, 2016 | © John R. Harris   DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 10/14/2016
Is your Leica M7 worth more than what you paid for it? How about the value of that Brownie in your grandfather’s closet, or even your first digital camera from 1995? With Heritage Auctions preparing to host its first-ever auction of collectible cameras, we take time to talk camera and lens collecting with Nigel Russel, of Heritage, and Gabriel Biderman, of B&H Photo. Russel is a world-recognized camera expert and photo historian, and discusses the criteria that make a camera retain or increase in value, the possibility of finding a collectible camera at a garage sale, and the general ins and outs of a camera auction. We also chat about Ansel Adams’s 4 x 5 camera that is currently up for auction, as well as the “cult” of Leica and even about a camera from the 1860s that uses water between the lenses to create a panoramic wide-angle view. A well-respected night photographer, Gabriel Biderman is also a camera collector whose first rule of collecting is to only acquire cameras with which he can actually take pictures. His collection includes cameras from each decade of the 20th Century, and he actively uses these film cameras, in addition to his growing list of digital cameras. Join us as we take on the subject of camera collecting from two distinct points of view and revel in the shared pleasure of classic photographica. Guests: Nigel Russel and Gabriel Biderman Ansel Adams's Arca-Swiss 4x5 View Camera used from 1964 to 1968 | Estimate: $70,000- $100,000 Ansel Adams's Arca-Swiss 4x5 View Camera Outfit used from 1964 to 1968 | Estimate: $70,000- $100,000 Willard D. Morgan's Leica IIIc Camera Outfit | Estimate: $10,000- $15,000 Reid III Type 1 Rangefinder Camera. English c. 1951 | Estimate: $1,500- $2,500 Kodak Ektra Rangefinder Camera Outfit- American, c. 1946 | Estimate: $1,200- $1,800 Kardon Signal Corps PH-629/UF Rangefinder Camera- American, Premier Instrument Corp. c. 1946 | Estimate: $1,500- $2,000 Leica I Camera- German, 1926/27 | Estimate: $1,500- $2,000 Nigel Russel, Allan Weitz, and Gabriel Biderman DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/26/2016
Wet-Collodion, Daguerreotype, Tintype, Calotype, Gum Bichromate, Van Dyke Brown. Oh my! On this week’s podcast, we welcome Geoffrey Berliner, Executive Director of the Penumbra Foundation, and photographer Jolene Lupo, to talk about alternative process photography. The Penumbra Foundation is an incredible organization, dedicated to the art, science, and history of photography and Berliner outlines their history and mission and the workshops and facilities they make available to all photographers, while Lupo discusses her tintype work at Penumbra and Spirit Photography. This episode is a true education, not just on the various alternative processes, but on the history of photography and on how learning the original pre-film processes will improve your digital photography. Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play. Photographs courtesy of Penumbra Foundation Tintypes and Albumen Silver Print by Jolene Lupo (including top shot) Photographs by John Harris b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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Posted 03/31/2016
The B&H Photography Podcast has been streaming for almost six months now. We have had some incredible guests and have discussed aspects of photography, from gear to technique to art to finding work. We pride ourselves on our eclectic approach to photography and are pleased to present this episode, which offers a wonderful set of clips from some of our first 20 episodes. We’ve chosen segments that highlight our broad range and provide the heart of the very insightful and entertaining conversations we have hosted. We also added a few bloopers just for fun. This “sampler platter” offers talks on drones, the digital versus film experience, Leica history, night photography, the Museum of Modern Art, the best cameras of 2015, and the future of DSLRs. Sit back (unless you’re driving), enjoy, and thank you for making our show such the success that it has become.     To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS. The Podcast team: John Harris, Allan Weitz, and Jason Tables   b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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