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Posted 02/02/2018
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast posits the notion that we are in a new “Golden Age” of landscape photography, and a fundamental attribute of this landscape photography is its embracing of digital and mobile technologies. From soaring ISO capabilities and improved dynamic range to stacking and correction software to weather, mapping, and pre-production apps, the willing photographer can plan and execute landscape images that would have been impossible to create only a few short years ago. We also suggest that the Pacific Northwest, with its proximity to the cradle of the tech industry and a spectrum of natural wonders, is the hub of this progressive landscape photography movement. Veteran photographers have adopted new technologies and created a movement, and a younger generation is following suit, certain to take landscape photography into a future that includes drones, VR, and imaging technologies yet to be imagined. We also discuss the influence of photo-sharing platforms and new career models that enable photographers to distribute their work and travel to destinations that editorial assignments would never cover. We welcome to our conversation two preëminent landscape photographers, Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw, who discuss their work and the use of the high-tech gear and applications in the creation of their photography. In addition to the obligatory Q and A about camera and lens choices, we discuss location and weather apps, post-process plug-ins, and even the latest foul-weather gear, all of which enable them to create the stunning work for which they are known. Both photographers are members of Photo Cascadia, and have a wide following of supporters and students. Their workshops sell out months in advance. After hearing their insights and seeing their imagery, there will be no doubt as to why. Also, at the end of today’s episode, we announce the winners of our Canon 5D Mark IV sweepstakes. Guests: Erin Babnik and Sean Bagshaw The Lost Ark © Erin Babnik Enigma © Erin Babnik Kairos © Erin Babnik Rhapsody in Blue © Erin Babnik Requiem © Erin Babnik Catching Air © Erin Babnik Wood and Stone © Sean Bagshaw The Gift Tree © Sean Bagshaw Summer Seclusion © Sean Bagshaw Mostnica Autumn © Sean Bagshaw Okshornan Peaks © Sean Bagshaw Bohinj Woods © Sean Bagshaw Lineage © Sean Bagshaw Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 06/02/2017
It’s a short week here at the B&H Photography Podcast, so we thought we’d take care of some cleaning that we have put off all winter. Unless one is a full-time pro or serious enthusiast, most of one’s photography is done in the fairer months of spring and summer, whether that be on family vacations, at sporting events, weekend picnics, or just working out that macro lens in the garden. So, it’s time to pull the camera bag from the closet and give our gear a quick once-over to make sure everything is in working order. In this episode, we discuss little ways to maintain cameras and lenses, and things to do to prepare them for the shooting season. From firmware upgrades to mode settings to dust and grease removal, there is a lot you can do in a short time to better understand your camera and to keep it functioning smoothly. In the second half of the show, we continue our serial “Dispatch,” with Adriane Ohanesian. This ongoing segment takes an inside look at the life and work of a freelance photojournalist working in East Africa. In this episode, Ohanesian updates us on her coverage of the conflict in Somalia as she spends time embedded with African Union troops and travels north, to photograph the effects of the ongoing drought in Puntland. She discusses being contracted by the International Rescue Committee to document the refugees “flowing” from war-torn South Sudan to settlement camps in Uganda and, finally, analyzes the risks and expenses freelance photographers take on while working in conflict zones—and the often adverse objectives of news organizations and NGOs. Guests: Todd Vorenkamp and Adriane Ohanesian Click here if you missed Episode 1 of "Dispatch." Photographs © Adriane Ohanesian Mohamed Abdi Bare, age 4, stares at the line of people inside of the waiting area at the Department of Refugee Affairs office in Shauri Moyo, Nairobi, Kenya, January, 2017. Ugandan African Union armored personnel carriers at dusk along the Afgooye road outside of Mogadishu, Somalia, February, 2017. The Ugandan African Union Special Forces wait inside of an armored personnel carrier during a night patrol in Mogadishu, Somalia, February, 2017. The shelters of nearly 400 pastoralists families who have lost a majority of their livestock due to drought, have set up camp along the road in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. Severely malnourished, Farhiyah, age 2, lies on the floor of her family’s hut where she stays with her three siblings and mother who came to the area in search of food and water in Uusgure, Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. The remains of dead goats lie next to the road in Puntland, Somalia, February, 2017. South Sudanese gather to collect their belongings that were transported to the Imvepi settlement for South Sudanese refugees who have fled to northern Uganda. March, 2017. Previous Pause Next DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/10/2017
Today’s episode broadens our normal photographic sphere as we discuss ophthalmic photography and how the eye’s own optical system is used in conjunction with camera equipment—some techniques very common, some not so—to examine the interior of the eye and to diagnose illnesses that go far beyond problems with vision. We are joined by Mark Maio, clinical medical and ophthalmic photographer and developer of the first high-resolution digital imaging system in ophthalmology. We talk with Maio about his early interest in social justice photography, working as a “jack-of-all-trades” photographer for a hospital, and how his eventual concentration in ophthalmic photography led to early adoption of digital technology and the development of a tool that helped to transform the industry. Throughout this conversation, we learn about the use of analog and digital photography in the biomedical field and how fundus cameras and other specialized gear are used to diagnose optical and systemic maladies. When the pupil is dilated, they eye becomes a portal into the body, and with the proper tools, we can see inside our corporeal system without cutting. Maio is also an accomplished fine art and documentary photographer, and we will also discuss how these various disciplines have intersected throughout his career and resulted in the workshops he leads on ophthalmic imaging, documentary, and landscape photography on the beautiful Isle of Skye. Guest: Mark Maio From the series Saving Sight-- The Flying Eye Hospital From the series Against the Grain – Buffalo Grain Industry From the series, Isle of Skye Previous Pause Next All photographs by Mark Maio DON'T MISS AN EPISODE SUBSCRIBE NOW:   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 09/15/2016
The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will be available on September 15, 2016, and we’ve organized an episode to celebrate iPhone photography, including a hands-on review of the new iPhone 7 Plus. Joining us are three photographers who bring unique perspectives to the imaging capabilities of the iPhone. First, we speak with Robin Robertis, a 2016 winner of the iPhone Photography Award and an artist for whom the iPhone provided a new creative tool for her ethereal and vibrant work. Next, we speak with Ed Kashi, a multi-faceted, veteran photojournalist and filmmaker who was one of five photographers assigned by Time magazine to document Hurricane Sandy with just an iPhone. Kashi also teaches workshops in iPhone photography for National Geographic, and will discuss how he incorporates mobile photography into his journalistic work. After a break, we speak with Brendan Ò Sè, a photographer from Cork, Ireland, whose playful image of the curved lines in Copenhagen’s Superkilen Park was chosen for the “Shot on iPhone 6” ad campaign. He'll talk with us about that experience and how the iPhone revived his love for photography. Finally, to put a bow on this episode, we sit with Olivier Laurent, editor of LightBox, at Time.com, to chat about his first impressions of the iPhone 7 Plus. Mr. Laurent was given the latest iPhone 7 before its official announcement to test and review its camera, and he shares his thoughts with us on the new features and specs. Guests: Robin Robertis- 02:00 Ed Kashi- 16:37 Brendan Ò Sè- 37:36 Olivier Laurent- 57:25 (iPhone 7 Review) Photographs above ©  Robin Robertis Photographs above ©  Ed Kashi Photographs above ©  Brendan Ò Sè Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play         Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 07/21/2016
What will our future selfies be like? Our guest, Stephen Mayes, suggests that they may be images of what we think rather than what we see. For those of you exasperated by the deluge of duck faces in your social media feed, this may be a terrifying idea, but is the selfie really that bad, and if so, how and why is it different than an artist’s self-portrait? These are the questions we address in this week’s episode and, to do so, we have invited the inimitable Mr. Mayes and photographer Nicky Wanzi, whose recent series of self-portraits, in which she depicts not only herself but also two of her best friends, was included in PDN’s 2016 Photo Annual. Join us for this enjoyable conversation as we expose the selfie.   Guests: Nicky Wanzi and Stephen Mayes                   Photos by Nicky Wanzi Nicky Wanzi, Allan Weitz, and Stephen Mayes Don't miss an episode! Subscribe on iTunes;   Stitcher; and  Google Play       b Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/03/2016
Despite poking a little fun with this episode’s title, we are big fans of photography websites and camera blogs, and if you are reading this, you probably are, too. On this week’s podcast, we are fortunate to have Kevin Raber and Jason Hermann, proprietors of Luminous Landscape and SonyAlphaLab, respectively. Have you ever wondered how sites like these operate, are funded, get gear to review and deal with the, shall we say “experts,” who populate the comment sections? In this very animated, on-point conversation, Raber and Hermann talk specifically about their sites, the proliferation of gear chat, and the camera industry in general. Guests: Kevin Raber and Jason Hermann To listen to this week’s episode: Listen to or download on  SoundCloud, or subscribe to the B&H Photography Podcast on  iTunes;  Stitcher;   SoundCloud; or via  RSS.   Photos by  Kevin Raber   Photos by Jason Hermann b Host: Allan Weitz Producer: John Harris Engineer: Jason Tables Executive Producers: Bryan Formhals, Mark Zuppe
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