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Posted 05/26/2020
Today we welcome a special guest to the B&H Photography Podcast: actor and comedian Jeff Garlin.  We also are launching the B&H Photography Podcast Leica Photo Challenge, so please click the link to find out how to enter to win a Leica Q2 Digital Camera. Jeff Garlin is well known as a stand-up comedian and, of course, as a star of the hit television shows, The Goldbergs and Curb Your Enthusiam. About fifteen years ago, he turned a love for photography, for the work of the masters—Alfred Eisenstadt, Jim Marshall, Mary Ellen Mark, to name a few—into his own photographic practice, and we are all the beneficiaries of his engaged eye. In March, Garlin debuted his series, “A Big Bowl of Wonderful,” at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles, and we talk to him about how this series of portraits of his co-stars and friends in the television community—many taken on set or backstage—developed over a long curve, one founded in respect for the medium and applied with a simple stratagem: see something interesting and frame it in the most creative way possible. With that in mind, we talk about trusting your gut, not overthinking a shot, being comfortable with your subjects, but also about gaining the confidence to take photos, especially of those you know and respect. Garlin also talks about his affinity for Leica, especially the M system, about the difference between actors and comedians, and talking photography with Jeff Bridges. We also ask him about his role as executive producer on the film, Finding Vivian Maier. This really is a photography lover’s conversation, summed up best by one of Garlin’s comments: “I’m taking a picture because it brings me joy.” About bringing joy. If you are interested in winning a Leica Q2 Digital Camera, be sure to enter the B&H Photography Podcast Leica Challenge, which launches May 28, 2020 and runs until June 21, 2020. Click the link, follow the instructions, submit a photo you have taken recently that reflects “life during shutdown,” and you could be the winner of this spectacular 47MP full-frame Leica camera.  Join us for a great episode. Guest: Jeff Garlin Photograph © Jeff Garlin John Mulaney © Jeff Garlin John Waters © Jeff Garlin Larry David © Jeff Garlin Sarah Silverman © Jeff Garlin Richard Lewis © Jeff Garlin JB Smoove © Jeff Garlin Richard Kind © Jeff Garlin Brian Cranston and Jonathan Banks © Jeff Garlin Trevor Noah © Jeff Garlin Wendy McClendon-Covey © Jeff Garlin "Jesus at the Comedy Store" © Jeff Garlin Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/19/2020
As an industry and as a hobby, the numbers indicate that drone flying and drone photography are still primarily the domain of men, but sustaining this disparity is ridiculous and it should and will change. Our two guests today are part of bringing about that change, and they do so by being good at their craft, by spreading the joy of flying, and teaching drone operation and photography to women and girls. Our first guest today is an Emmy Award-winning camerawoman for CBS News and F.A.A. licensed drone pilot Carmaine Means, who incorporates quadcopter footage into her news coverage and, of course, flies for fun. After a break, we are joined by Yasmin Tajik, a documentary photographer and F.A.A. licensed drone operator who is also the Brand Ambassador Director for the educational and advocacy group Women Who Drone. We get to know the work of each guest, asking Means how and when she decides to use aerial footage in a news segment, what her personal guidelines are for launching a drone, and what the planning stage is like with her producers. We also talk about the value of certain aerial shots in telling a story, about the equipment she uses, and handling the drones in various conditions. Currently, she flies with a DJI Phantom and an Inspire. With Yasmin Tajik, we mention the Federal Aviation Administration licensing process and she recommends the FAA Drone Zone as a good place to start. We also ask her about using drones in documentary work and some of the restrictions placed on flying in the U.S. and other countries. As a resident of Arizona, she discusses some of the advantages of flying in that state, as well as unique guidelines they have established. We also speak about how she learned to fly after initially being hesitant, the work done by Women Who Drone, and taking her Tello Quadcopter into schools and the interest it generates from the next generation of flyers. Tajik also points to the many industries and services that are incorporating drones and the growing opportunities available for licensed pilots, but we don’t forget to talk about the joy she gets by using her DJI Mavic 2 to provide a perspective on the world that our land-based cameras can never match. Join us for this enjoyable and inspirational conversation and if you are a female drone flyer, we’d love to hear your experiences and see your images. Guests: Carmaine Means and Yasmin Tajik Photograph © Yasmin Tajik​ © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik © Yasmin Tajik Courtesy Yasmin Tajik © Carmaine Means © Carmaine Means © Carmaine Means Courtesy Carmaine Means Carmaine Means © Phillip Dembinsky Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/11/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we talk about food photography with photographer Chelsea Kyle and food stylist Drew Aichele. There are few photography disciplines that are as complicated as food photography. With the pressure of time, heat, cold, color, and light, a small team must work together to create an image that realistically illustrates the sumptuousness of a dish, but also is a visually striking composition. Collaboration is key and, in this case, it’s fortunate that Kyle and Aichele are also a couple, engaged to be married. We are grateful they were able to join us today. We discuss aspects of the professional process from client and editor, to recipe experts, to the stylists and photographers, and ask who determines what the “look” will be and how that is played out on set. We also discuss camera and lenses, lighting gear, and all accessories that are used in this space, which is part kitchen, part workshop, and part photo studio. Kyle stumps host Allan Weitz, mentioning a piece of grip gear with which even he is not familiar. Because our guests live together, and despite the huge hit the industry has taken, they have been able to work during the shutdown, and we discuss how they have adapted to handling all aspects of a shoot in their own kitchen. We talk about sourcing supplies when many stores and bakeries are closed, about using Zoom to direct a remote shoot, and speculate on the future of this very collaborative profession. Join us for this insightful episode and let us know how these tough times have affected your photography… and your cooking. Guests: Chelsea Kyle and Drew Aichele Above photograph © Chelsea Kyle​ Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Photograph © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Image © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Image © Chelsea Kyle, Food Styling by Drew Aichele Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 05/06/2020
Ray Collins’s portraits of waves are hard to describe because you don’t want to describe them. Like the wave itself, the photographic abstraction refuses words; indescribable and amorphous become unique and powerful in his hands. One look at his work and it’s clear that he is in his element in the surf, transforming what he knows so well into a profound and universal statement. We have been looking forward to speaking with Collins for a while, and are very pleased to present our conversation with him on this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast. We start our chat asking how he went from being a coal miner in New South Wales, Australia, to a photographer, and then melding that new love with his first love, surfing and the ocean. It’s a good story and it gets better as we learn how he transitioned from surf photography to fine-art photography and book publishing. We ask about working in the ocean, the dangers, “knowing” certain waves, and the ability to maneuver his gear and body to anticipate the photos he wants to capture. We also discuss the gear he uses, from his Nikon D850 to Aquatech housing, to the surprising range of lenses he uses in the water. We also discuss the non-photo equipment he needs to stay afloat and navigate. After a short break, we discuss his post-process decisions and how he looks for texture as much as color when deciding upon which images he prefers. Interestingly, for a photographer whose color work is so gorgeous, Collins is color blind and he talks about how he has turned that into an advantage for him. We also chat about printmaking and book publishing with this incredibly talented and friendly photographer. Join us for an inspiring conversation and check out the work of Ray Collins. Guest: Ray Collins Photograph © Ray Collins Blue Curve © Ray Collins Crystal © Ray Collins Eagle © Ray Collins Holocene © Ray Collins Light Shower © Ray Collins Oil © Ray Collins The Wall © Ray Collins I © Ray Collins II © Ray Collins VII © Ray Collins Courtesy Ray Collins Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/28/2020
This week on the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome journalist, curator, and author Ekow Eshun to discuss his incredible new book, Africa State of Mind. With more than 250 photographs by fifty photographers, the book is a gorgeous collection of contemporary art photography from throughout Africa. Established artists such as Pieter Hugo and Zanele Muholi are profiled, along with many lesser-known photographers working in (and between) a range of genres. Supported by Eshun’s insightful commentary, the book delves into the unique voices depicting their Africa experience today. Our conversation begins with the master portrait photographers of the mid 20th century, such as Malick Sidibé, but quickly jumps to the contemporary as we ask about his research for the book, the book’s four intriguing sections, and the common threads that tie together the varied photographers’ work. "I was really interested in photographers who aren't interested in reality per se… who don't claim that their photos are what is!" Like our conversation, this book offers an introduction to the artists, from Morocco to South Africa, who are utilizing their subjective experiences and particular talents to reimagine what it means to be African. Join us for this informative and enjoyable discussion. Guest: Ekow Eshun Ditaola VII, 2014 © Mohau Modisakeng Afrikan Boy Sittin’, 2013 © Hassan Hajjaj People washing their clothes in the swimming pool of The Grande, a once luxurious hotel in Beira, Mozambique, 2013 © Guillaume Bonn Swimming Pool III, Bamako, 2009 © François-Xavier Gbré Nana and Razak, 2016 © Eric Gyamfi Bhekezakhe, Parktown, 2016 © Zanele Muholi. Courtesy of Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York This is how you start a party! 2017 © Musa N. Nxumalo Kingsley Ossai, Nsukka, Enugu state, Nigeria, 2017 © Ruth Ossai Night of the Long Knives I, 2013 © Athi-Patra Ruga. Courtesy WHATIFTHEWORLD Untitled, 2012 © Nobukho Nqaba Eleventh, 2018 © Lina Iris Viktor, 2018. Courtesy the Artist and Marianne Ibrahim Gallery, Chicago Mevetwapi Joya, Kunene Region, Namibia, 2015 © Kyle Weeks Ekow Eshun © Antonio Olmos Previous Pause Next
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Posted 04/22/2020
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome National Geographic photographer Steve Winter back to the program. Winter joined us, in 2016, to discuss his wildlife photography, specifically his work photographing cougars in the hills of Los Angeles, California, and today we will be discussing tigers. Over the past several years, Winter has been working on stories about tigers, initially in Sumatra, Thailand, and India, but most recently in the United States, where there are more tigers in captivity than exist in their increasingly shrinking natural habitats in Asia. The majority of these tigers are pets, are in sanctuaries, or are used as part of small private zoos and tourist attractions. His most recent story for NatGeo, which was honored with a 2020 World Press Photo award, explores this phenomenon—the good, the bad, and very ugly of it. We speak with Winter about the production and research for this series, about photographing the animals, as well as the owners, handlers, and tourists, and the dangers of each. We discuss how he utilized his news and documentary skills, in addition to his wildlife photography experience, and about the gear decisions he made to help bring this story to life. We also dig into the practice of breeding, crossbreeding, and maintaining predator cats for profit and the issues of illegal trafficking, tiger farms, and of legitimate sanctuaries. Finally, we focus on the positive changes that have come from Winter’s many stories on the world’s big cats. Guest: Steve Winter Photograph © Steve Winter Tigers cool off in a pool at The Wild Animal Sanctuary, in Keenesburg, Colorado, USA. The sanctuary rescues animals and cares for them in large open habitats, giving them veterinary attention and proper nutrition. Visitors view them from afar, with no interaction. July, 2019. © Steve Winter for National Geographic Gregg Woody, owner of Woody’s Menagerie, and his wife display an eight-week-old cub named Sophie at the Ogle County Fair in Illinois, USA. August, 2018. © Steve Winter for National Geographic Staff at Myrtle Beach Safari entertainment facility in South Carolina, USA, control tigers during a photo session. April, 2019. © Steve Winter for National Geographic Gir, a lion-tiger hybrid, now at the Tiger Haven Sanctuary in Kingston, Tennessee, USA, was rescued from an exotic animal park after he grew too large for public handling and has serious health issues caused by inbreeding and malnutrition. June, 2019. © Steve Winter for National Geographic Lori Ensign-Scroggins feeds chicken tidbits to Langley, a 125-kilogram tiliger (two-thirds tiger, one-third lion) that she adopted when he grew too big for petting, in her kitchen in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, USA. March, 2019. © Steve Winter for National Geographic Owner Pat Craig and his dog Little Bit make the rounds of The Wild Animal Refuge, in Colorado, USA. The accredited carnivore sanctuary includes a 4,000 hectare refuge for rescued animals that is not accessible to the public. July, 2019. © Steve Winter for National Geographic © Steve Winter for National Geographic, 2018 USFW officer James Markley displays one of five tiger skulls he dug up at GW Exotic Animal Park in Wynnewood, Oklahoma. © Steve Winter for National Geographic, 2019 © Steve Winter for National Geographic, 2019 A toy stuffed-animal tiger placed in an abandoned car at Disaster City in College Station Texas, which is a part of Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service and used for training first responders. © Steve Winter for National Geographic, 2019 Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/06/2020
Ike & Tash are a husband-and-wife photography team. You know what? They tell it better than I can. “We are a FAMILY business, a LEGACY business, a husband-wife team that found our dream and our FUTURE behind the lens. With our 3-year-old daughter, Wisdom, we travel around the country teaching photographers, taking pictures and making memories... all the while helping others to keep theirs, forever.” Ike & Tash joined us for a conversation at the Depth of Field Conference to talk about their wedding and engagement photography, senior portraiture, and work as educators and mentors. We touched on photo and business topics and how they individually and collectively approach storytelling. It was just a really nice chat. That’s the first part of this week’s B&H Photography Podcast. Understanding how the wedding photography business has been particularly affected by the virus outbreak, we asked Ike & Tash to send us a quick follow-up on how they’ve been doing the past few weeks, and they were kind enough to agree. We thank Ike & Tash for joining us and our listeners for sticking with the show these past few weeks. We look forward to a holiday break next week and to coming back with great new episodes. We also appreciate your comments on Apple Podcasts and the B&H Photography Podcast Facebook Group. Enjoy the episode and stay safe. Guests: Ike and Tash Photograph © Ike & Tash Photography Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Photograph © Ike & Tash Photo Ike, Allan, and Tash © John Harris Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/01/2020
Flying in directly from a post-Oscar party in Hollywood, Greg Gorman joined us for a conversation at the 2020 Depth of Field Photo Conference this February, where he was the keynote speaker. Given all that has happened since, it seems like a long time ago, but this is the type of chat we wish would have just kept going, so enjoyable was Gorman and his tales of Hollywood then and now. Still in demand by A-listers, Gorman’s work reaches back to touch the Golden Age of Hollywood, with portraits of Brando, Hitchcock, and Orson Welles, from his early career, and just about everyone else since. It’s not even worth listing the “who’s who;” we do ask about a few famous names and how he got started, but mostly we talk technique and lighting. We start with his thoughts on film versus digital photography and then delve into his work with continuous lighting compared to strobe and his current penchant for Rotolight LED and Sony camera systems. We also discuss the importance of gaining the trust of your subjects and having a consistent production team to maintain your desired look, as well as an efficient workflow. We wrap with a segment on the importance (and difficulty) of self-editing and then touch on the selection and sequencing process for the eleven books he has published and the career retrospective that is in the works and scheduled for publication later this year. Check out Gorman’s incredible body of work and join us for this fun conversation. Guest: Greg Gorman Alfred Hitchcock, 1970 © Greg Gorman Kirk Douglas, 1989 © Greg Gorman Orson Welles, 1970 © Greg Gorman John Water’s Lips, 1994 © Greg Gorman David Bowie, 1984 © Greg Gorman Leonardo DiCaprio, 1994 © Greg Gorman Al Pacino from “Scarface,” 1983 © Greg Gorman Tom Waits, 1980 © Greg Gorman Dustin Hoffman, “Tootsie” poster art, 1982 © Greg Gorman Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/25/2020
Today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast hosts a compelling conversation with four photojournalists who are covering stories related to the COVID-19 outbreak in New York. We discuss the stories they have been photographing, the precautions they are taking, how they’ve adjusted their shooting styles, and about the assignments they are willing to accept and those they would like to pitch. Joining us are Sarah Blesener, a documentarian covering stories for The New York Times and Wall Street Journal. She is a recipient of an Alexia Foundation grant and is a Catchlight and Eugene Smith fellow. Her 2019 project, Beckon Us From Home, received a first-place prize in the Long-Term Project category of World Press Photo. We also welcome veteran photojournalist John Taggart, who has worked for The New York Times, the Washington Post, Bloomberg, Reuters, and many other outlets. Based in Brooklyn, he is no stranger to the streets and subways of New York. After a break, we speak with Desiree Rios, a Mexican-American photojournalist and documentary photographer from Fort Worth, Texas. She is currently based in New York, working for The New York Times, but has covered stories from California to Cuba. Finally, we welcome Andrew Seng, who is based in Brooklyn and also works in Portland. His work focuses on creating a visual archive of the Cambodian diaspora, while questioning the formation of visual ideas of race and identity. He has worked for The New York Times, WNYC, Teach for America, The Los Angeles Times, and The Guardian, among others. Seng has also been a past guest on our show. Join us for this timely and informative episode. Guests: Sarah Blesener, John Taggart, Desiree Rios, and Andrew Seng Photograph © Andrew Seng A stock exchange worker heads into the New York Stock Exchange in Wall Street early on a Friday morning, March 13, 2020. Mayor DeBlasio has declared a state of emergency in NYC, and large gatherings have been banned. © Sarah Blesener for the Wall Street Journal A man works out in Coney Island on a Saturday morning, March 21. The beach is usually crowded with tourists and locals. Mayor DeBlasio has declared a state of emergency in NYC, and large gatherings have been banned. On Sunday evening, new rules will take effect and will shut down all nonessential businesses across the state. © Sarah Blesener for The Wall Street Journal Target employees restock food after a busy weekend. Several retailers have shortened hours to give employees more time to stock shelves. Aisles of food, toilet paper, and antibacterial cleaning supplies are nearly empty in this store in the Lower East Side. ©Sarah Blesener for The New York Times The Atlantic Avenue Barclays Center station, one of Brooklyn’s busiest subway stops, was all but abandoned on Monday. March 16, 2020 © John Taggart for The New York Times A commuter wearing a protective mask crosses the East River by ferry. © John Taggart Tear sheet of New York Times front page with photo by John Taggart © Courtesy of the photographer A woman having her nails done at King Suki Nails in the Kingsbridge neighborhood of the Bronx, New York on Saturday afternoon. March 21, 2020 ©Desiree Rios for The New York Times A young woman helps her father unpack flowers outside of High Ridge Lotto & Candy in the Bronx, New York on Saturday, March 21, 2020. © Desiree Rios for The New York Times An employee at a nursing home talks on the phone while wearing a medical mask, in the Kingsbridge neighborhood of the Bronx, New York on Saturday, March 21, 2020. © Desiree Rios for The New York Times National Guard Private First-Class Donald James helps clean the Jewish Community Center of Mid-Westchester On Monday, March 16, 2020, in Scarsdale, NY (this image has been slightly modified from the original) © Andrew Seng for the New York Times Members of the National Guard disinfect surfaces at the Jewish Community Center of Mid-Westchester on Monday, March 16, 2020, in Scarsdale, NY © Andrew Seng for The New York Times Health care professionals hold a demonstration of the Covid-19 testing process on Monday, March 16, 2020, in New Rochelle, NY © Andrew Seng for the New York Times Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/17/2020
Today, we discuss some of the most recognized images of rock-n-roll history. Our first guest is photographer Amelia Davis, who is the owner of Jim Marshall LLC, the living archive of the prolific photographer Jim Marshall, most known for his images of jazz and rock musicians of the 1950s through the 1970s. If you are familiar with photos of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, Johnny Cash, or the Allman Brothers Band, then you are certain to know his work. Marshall not only covered the Monterrey and Altamont festivals, but was the only photographer invited by the Beatles to photograph their final concert. Marshall also documented the Civil Rights movement and the Haight-Ashbury scene in San Francisco. With Davis, we discuss how she came to be the proprietor of the archive and how she protects and manages the collection. We also talk about Marshall, the man, and why he was seemingly able to photograph “everyone” in that era. Davis is also part of the production team behind the new film "Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall,” which is well worth seeing to get a better understanding of Marshall’s motley personality and his incredible body of work. After our chat with Davis, we welcome photographer Elliott Landy, who is currently producing a book of his images on the seminal rock group, The Band. Landy was the official photographer of the famed Woodstock music festival and responsible for unforgettable images of Van Morrison and Bob Dylan, among others. Elliot is running a Kickstarter campaign to create Contacting the Band, which will take a deep dive into the thousands of photos he took of the group in concert and around their homes, in Woodstock, NY. We encourage you to check the Kickstarter link above and enjoy this episode. Guests: Amelia Davis and Elliott Landy Photograph © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Jimi Hendrix at Monterey Pop Festival, 1967 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Beatles coming onto the stage at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, for their last concert 1966 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Bob Dylan, New York City, 1963 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Johnny Cash at San Quentin Prison, 1969 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Janis Joplin and her 1964 Porsche 356 C Cabriolet, 1968 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Mick Jagger & Keith Richards, Exile on Main Street Studio Recordings,1972 Miles Davis, 1971 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Game arcade, San Francisco, 1962 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Mississippi, 1963 © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Jim Marshall with Leica © Jim Marshall Photography LLC Elliott Landy with his photograph of The Band © Elliott Landy The Band, Woodstock, 1969 (album cover for “The Band” LP) © Elliott Landy “Contacting The Band” by Elliott Landy © Elliott Landy Previous Pause Next Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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